vicsvaporrub:

how can you be sad when this exists

vicsvaporrub:

how can you be sad when this exists

(Source: weheartit.com, via laughterkey)

theonion:

Artifacts Discovered Buried In Washington D.C. Suggest Humans Once Passed Laws There

Your paper brain and your Kindle brain aren’t the same thing
Photo: A commuter reads on a Kindle e-reader while riding the subway in Cambridge, Mass. Neuroscience says the way his brain treats reading on the Kindle is different than the way the brain processes the newspaper next to him.
Would you like paper or plasma? That’s the question book lovers face now that e-reading has gone mainstream. And, as it turns out, our brains process digital reading very differently.
Manoush Zomorodi, managing editor and host of WNYC’s New Tech City, recalls a conversation with the Washington Post’s Mike Rosenwald, who’s researched the effects of reading on a screen. “He found, like I did, that when he sat down to read a book his brain was jumping around on the page. He was skimming and he couldn’t just settle down. He was treating a book like he was treating his Twitter feed,” she says.
Neuroscience, in fact, has revealed that humans use different parts of the brain when reading from a piece of paper or from a screen. So the more you read on screens, the more your mind shifts towards “non-linear” reading — a practice that involves things like skimming a screen or having your eyes dart around a web page.
“They call it a ‘bi-literate’ brain,” Zoromodi says. “The problem is that many of us have adapted to reading online just too well. And if you don’t use the deep reading part of your brain, you lose the deep reading part of your brain.”
So what’s deep reading? It’s the concentrated kind we do when we want to “immerse ourselves in a novel or read a mortgage document,” Zoromodi says. And that uses the kind of long-established linear reading you don’t typically do on a computer. “Dense text that we really want to understand requires deep reading, and on the internet we don’t do that.”
Linear reading and digital distractions have caught the attention of academics like Maryanne Wolf, director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University.
“I don’t worry that we’ll become dumb because of the Internet,” Wolf says, “but I worry we will not use our most preciously acquired deep reading processes because we’re just given too much stimulation. That’s, I think, the nub of the problem.”
To keep the deep reading part of the brain alive and kicking, Zomorodi says that researchers like Wolf recommend setting aside some time each day to deep read on paper.
And now that children are seemingly growing up with a digital screen in each hand, Wolf says it’s also important that teachers and parents make sure kids are taking some time away from scattered reading. Adults need to ensure that children also practice the deeper, slow reading that we associate with books on paper.
“I think the evidence someday will be able to show us that what we’re after is a discerning ‘bi-literate’ brain,” Wolf says. “That’s going to take some wisdom on our part.”

Your paper brain and your Kindle brain aren’t the same thing

Photo: A commuter reads on a Kindle e-reader while riding the subway in Cambridge, Mass. Neuroscience says the way his brain treats reading on the Kindle is different than the way the brain processes the newspaper next to him.

Would you like paper or plasma? That’s the question book lovers face now that e-reading has gone mainstream. And, as it turns out, our brains process digital reading very differently.

Manoush Zomorodi, managing editor and host of WNYC’s New Tech City, recalls a conversation with the Washington Post’s Mike Rosenwald, who’s researched the effects of reading on a screen. “He found, like I did, that when he sat down to read a book his brain was jumping around on the page. He was skimming and he couldn’t just settle down. He was treating a book like he was treating his Twitter feed,” she says.

Neuroscience, in fact, has revealed that humans use different parts of the brain when reading from a piece of paper or from a screen. So the more you read on screens, the more your mind shifts towards “non-linear” reading — a practice that involves things like skimming a screen or having your eyes dart around a web page.

“They call it a ‘bi-literate’ brain,” Zoromodi says. “The problem is that many of us have adapted to reading online just too well. And if you don’t use the deep reading part of your brain, you lose the deep reading part of your brain.”

So what’s deep reading? It’s the concentrated kind we do when we want to “immerse ourselves in a novel or read a mortgage document,” Zoromodi says. And that uses the kind of long-established linear reading you don’t typically do on a computer. “Dense text that we really want to understand requires deep reading, and on the internet we don’t do that.”

Linear reading and digital distractions have caught the attention of academics like Maryanne Wolf, director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University.

“I don’t worry that we’ll become dumb because of the Internet,” Wolf says, “but I worry we will not use our most preciously acquired deep reading processes because we’re just given too much stimulation. That’s, I think, the nub of the problem.”

To keep the deep reading part of the brain alive and kicking, Zomorodi says that researchers like Wolf recommend setting aside some time each day to deep read on paper.

And now that children are seemingly growing up with a digital screen in each hand, Wolf says it’s also important that teachers and parents make sure kids are taking some time away from scattered reading. Adults need to ensure that children also practice the deeper, slow reading that we associate with books on paper.

“I think the evidence someday will be able to show us that what we’re after is a discerning ‘bi-literate’ brain,” Wolf says. “That’s going to take some wisdom on our part.”

(via treehouse154)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Anne Bradstreet (1672)
A book published in London in 1650 was mysteriously titled, The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America and its author was described as “a Gentlewoman in those parts.” The work was, in fact, written by Anne Bradstreet, a Puritan who had moved to Massachusetts from England in June 1630. Mrs. Bradstreet became the first American poet ever published.
Although the poems included in The Tenth Muse were written between 1635 and 1650, poems written by Mrs. Bradstreet date back to 1632 when she was not yet 20 years old. Focusing on religious themes and everyday occurences, the poems seem simple to critics today but were widely regarded by her 17th century audience, including legendary Puritan preacher Cotton Mather.
Mrs. Bradstreet, whose father and husband helped found Harvard, moved around Massachusetts living for periods in Salem, Boston, Cambridge, and finally living the remainder of her life in North Andover. She gave birth to eight children between 1633 and 1652, four daughters and four sons, and continued to produce poetry while being responsible for childcare and all domestic responsibilities.
Mrs. Bradstreet died at the age of 60 on September 16, 1672 and was, presumably, buried in North Andover’s Old Burying Ground. She did not live to see the American publication of her poetry in 1678 newly titled, Several Poems Compiled with Great Variety of Wit and Learning. 
It would take two centuries for the rest of Mrs. Bradstreet’s work to be made available to the public. In 1867, John Harvard Ellis re-issued The Tenth Muse and also included the never-before-seen  "Religious Experiences and Occasional Pieces" and "Meditations Divine and Morall". The latter works were much different than Mrs. Bradstreet’s earlier poetry and have received generally positive acclaim from modern critics.
In North Andover they honor Mrs. Bradstreet with a gravestone in the Old Burying Yard (since her exact burial site is unknown) and a plaque honoring the 350th anniversary of the publication of The Tenth Muse. In 1997, Harvard dedicated the Bradstreet Gate in her name as America’s first published poet.
You can find many of Mrs. Bradstreet’s poem here. 
Sources: Wikipedia, poets.org, poetryfoundation.org, and Perspectives in American Literature
(Image of the title page from the first edition of The Tenth Muse, published by Rev. John Woodbridge in London in 1850. This copy is in the special collections of the Brown University Library.)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Anne Bradstreet (1672)

A book published in London in 1650 was mysteriously titled, The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America and its author was described as “a Gentlewoman in those parts.” The work was, in fact, written by Anne Bradstreet, a Puritan who had moved to Massachusetts from England in June 1630. Mrs. Bradstreet became the first American poet ever published.

Although the poems included in The Tenth Muse were written between 1635 and 1650, poems written by Mrs. Bradstreet date back to 1632 when she was not yet 20 years old. Focusing on religious themes and everyday occurences, the poems seem simple to critics today but were widely regarded by her 17th century audience, including legendary Puritan preacher Cotton Mather.

Mrs. Bradstreet, whose father and husband helped found Harvard, moved around Massachusetts living for periods in Salem, Boston, Cambridge, and finally living the remainder of her life in North Andover. She gave birth to eight children between 1633 and 1652, four daughters and four sons, and continued to produce poetry while being responsible for childcare and all domestic responsibilities.

Mrs. Bradstreet died at the age of 60 on September 16, 1672 and was, presumably, buried in North Andover’s Old Burying Ground. She did not live to see the American publication of her poetry in 1678 newly titled, Several Poems Compiled with Great Variety of Wit and Learning. 

It would take two centuries for the rest of Mrs. Bradstreet’s work to be made available to the public. In 1867, John Harvard Ellis re-issued The Tenth Muse and also included the never-before-seen  "Religious Experiences and Occasional Pieces" and "Meditations Divine and Morall". The latter works were much different than Mrs. Bradstreet’s earlier poetry and have received generally positive acclaim from modern critics.

In North Andover they honor Mrs. Bradstreet with a gravestone in the Old Burying Yard (since her exact burial site is unknown) and a plaque honoring the 350th anniversary of the publication of The Tenth Muse. In 1997, Harvard dedicated the Bradstreet Gate in her name as America’s first published poet.

You can find many of Mrs. Bradstreet’s poem here

Sources: Wikipedia, poets.org, poetryfoundation.org, and Perspectives in American Literature

(Image of the title page from the first edition of The Tenth Muse, published by Rev. John Woodbridge in London in 1850. This copy is in the special collections of the Brown University Library.)

danisdapper:

Fuck you Waldo, and your delightful destination vacations.

danisdapper:

Fuck you Waldo, and your delightful destination vacations.

(Source: sailormoonscenery)